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Light On Light Through


You'll hear a little of this and lot of that on Light On Light Through - my reviews of great television series, my interviews with authors and creative media people and their interviews of me, my political commentary, thoughts about my favorite cars and food and space travel, discussions of my music, and a few of my readings from my science fiction stories. These are usually audio and a few are video.  In the first years, starting in 2006, I put up a new episode at least once a month.  More recently, it's become more or less often than once a month, usually a lot less often.  But now, in the Fall of 2018, I'm getting more in the mood to podcast, and you can expect new episodes at least once a month.  - Paul Levinson

A Nice, Quiet Post About Tomatoes

Aug 28, 2007

I picked up a tall, straggly tomato plant at the local nursery last week.  In its better days, the plant would have sold for $45 - the pot still had the sticker with that price.   That would have been at least a month or more ago.  As it was, the clerk let me have the plant for $7, plus a 20-percent discount.

The plant had about 8 tomatoes and half a dozen yellow flowers when we put it in the back seat of our car.  By the time I put it and gingerly staked it in our backyard, it had lost two of its tomatoes and half of its flowers.

The first few days are never kind to a transplant.   However good the new conditions, they represent a shock in comparison to where the plant has been situated.  About half the leaves turned yellow (not good) and brown.

But I went to water the plant today, I noticed three things:

  1. there was some good new stem and leaf growth
  2. there were at least four new flowers
  3. one of the older flowers had turned in a little green tomato
I'm happy.

Next step will be eating the tomatoes.   I'll be back to you with a full report, then - figure, in a couple of weeks.*

*Hey, I'm back sooner than that - check out A Umami Tomato...

tomatobotaniccal

early European depiction of the tomato, about 1600
courtesy
foodmuseum.com/tomato.html